You are currently in the wal section of the site.

No thank you, please close this banner.

Last updated:
19/10/2018

Claiming benefits

  1. Overview
  2. Understanding your options
  3. Speaking on my behalf
  4. Claiming benefits
  5. Tax credits
  6. What is Lasting Power of Attorney?
  7. What is a Court of Protection appointed Deputy?
  8. Which bills are most important to pay first?
  9. Next steps
If you are finding it difficult to deal with the benefit system, you may be able to have a trusted person claim your benefits on your behalf. This is called having an ‘appointee’.

If you are finding it difficult to deal with the benefit system, you may be able to have a trusted person claim your benefits on your behalf. This is called having an ‘appointee’.

If you want someone to become your appointee you need to notify your local Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) office and fill in form BF56. The DWP may say they have to visit you and your carer, friend or relative before deciding if they can be your appointee.

You can also contact the local authority with regard to housing benefit and/or council tax support claims. If the local authority has made someone your appointee, you should be able to provide evidence of this to the DWP so they can also make the same person your appointee for other benefits, and vice versa.

Share this article

Within this subject

  1. Overview
  2. Understanding your options
  3. Speaking on my behalf
  4. Claiming benefits
  5. Tax credits
  6. What is Lasting Power of Attorney?
  7. What is a Court of Protection appointed Deputy?
  8. Which bills are most important to pay first?
  9. Next steps
x

Is this article helpful to you?

Was this article helpful to you?

×
Please tell us more

For urgent help, please see Help & contacts