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Last updated:
17/11/2017

Should I get supporting evidence?

  1. Overview
  2. What is PIP?
  3. What if I claim Disability Living Allowance (DLA)?
  4. Who can get Personal Independence Payment (PIP)?
  5. How will I be assessed for Personal Independence Payment (PIP)?
  6. How do I claim?
  7. What questions are on the ‘How your disability affects you’ form?
  8. Should I get supporting evidence?
  9. Will I have to go to a face to face medical assessment?
  10. Can I appeal if I think a decision is wrong?
  11. Do I need to speak to a welfare advisor?
  12. What happens if my health changes when I’m getting Personal Independence Payment (PIP)?
  13. Can someone claim Personal Independence Payment (PIP) for me?
  14. Information on Personal Independence Payment (PIP)
  15. Next steps
The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) must take all medical evidence into account when making a decision about your Personal Independence Payment (PIP) claim.

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) must take all medical evidence into account when making a decision about your Personal Independence Payment (PIP) claim. However, they may not contact your GP or other professionals for more information about your health.

Your healthcare professionals do not have to give you evidence if you ask for it. However, we strongly recommend that you try to get as much up to date medical evidence as you can. This could be your GP, psychiatrist, care coordinator, community psychiatric nurse (CPN), social worker or support worker. You can give more than one letter for medical evidence.

It is important that any supporting evidence has information about the difficulties your illness causes you and how you meet the criteria for the benefit. It is not very helpful for evidence just to say what diagnosis, symptoms or treatment you have. You can use this sample letter to help ask healthcare professionals for supporting evidence.  

It may help to send copies of other documents such as your care plan, a list of your prescribed medications, details of any therapies you are having and any other medical documents you have which contain useful information.

Photocopy any supporting evidence you send to the DWP, and keep the originals.

If you can, send your supporting evidence by either recorded or special delivery. You will be able to find out when your letter arrives at the DWP.

 

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Within this subject

  1. Overview
  2. What is PIP?
  3. What if I claim Disability Living Allowance (DLA)?
  4. Who can get Personal Independence Payment (PIP)?
  5. How will I be assessed for Personal Independence Payment (PIP)?
  6. How do I claim?
  7. What questions are on the ‘How your disability affects you’ form?
  8. Should I get supporting evidence?
  9. Will I have to go to a face to face medical assessment?
  10. Can I appeal if I think a decision is wrong?
  11. Do I need to speak to a welfare advisor?
  12. What happens if my health changes when I’m getting Personal Independence Payment (PIP)?
  13. Can someone claim Personal Independence Payment (PIP) for me?
  14. Information on Personal Independence Payment (PIP)
  15. Next steps
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