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Last updated:
20/11/2017

Tips for representing yourself

  1. Overview
  2. The appeals process
  3. Preparing your appeal
  4. Setting out your argument in writing
  5. Making arrangements for the tribunal
  6. Going to the hearing
  7. Tips for representing yourself
  8. Can I appeal against my council tax support or housing benefit decision?
  9. Next steps

Tip 1: Take your time. Ask for more information or a break if you need one.

The panel will ask you questions about your illness and how it affects you. You should take your time when answering. If you do not understand the question, ask them to repeat it or to explain it slowly.

It is important to be polite to the panel. If you feel that you are finding it difficult to stay calm or you are becoming upset, you can ask the panel for a short break.

It is important to be polite to the panel. If you feel that you are finding it difficult to stay calm or you are becoming upset, you can ask the panel for a short break.

Tip 2: Answer the questions as fully and as honestly as you can

When giving your answers, be open and honest. It can be hard to talk about medical problems and the help that you need. You can plan what you will say about issues you find difficult to talk about. You can practice saying it out loud. Or you may want to write it down in your written submission and then make the tribunal aware of it during the hearing.

Tip 3: Try to give specific examples

It may be helpful to bring notes and examples so you remember what you want to say. The panel will probably ask you to describe your typical day. It can be hard to describe a ‘typical’ day if your mood or health can be different from day to day. Try to explain this to the panel. Let them know what you can do on a good day and a bad day and how often you have bad days.

Tip 4: Take along a friend or relative

You can take along a friend, carer, or relative for support. They can help you during the tribunal by asking you questions. They can remind you of things you may have forgotten, but they cannot speak for you. You have to answer the questions yourself. If someone tries to talk to the tribunal for you the judge will probably stop them.

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Within this subject

  1. Overview
  2. The appeals process
  3. Preparing your appeal
  4. Setting out your argument in writing
  5. Making arrangements for the tribunal
  6. Going to the hearing
  7. Tips for representing yourself
  8. Can I appeal against my council tax support or housing benefit decision?
  9. Next steps
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