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Last updated:
10/04/2018

What is PIP?

  1. Overview
  2. What is PIP?
  3. What if I claim Disability Living Allowance (DLA)?
  4. Who can get Personal Independence Payment (PIP)?
  5. How will I be assessed for Personal Independence Payment (PIP)?
  6. How do I claim?
  7. What questions are on the ‘How your disability affects you’ form?
  8. Should I get supporting evidence?
  9. Will I have to go to a face to face medical assessment?
  10. Can I appeal if I think a decision is wrong?
  11. Do I need to speak to a welfare advisor?
  12. What happens if my health changes when I’m getting Personal Independence Payment (PIP)?
  13. Can someone claim Personal Independence Payment (PIP) for me?
  14. Information on Personal Independence Payment (PIP)
  15. Next steps
Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is a disability benefit paid to people who are 16 to 64 years old. It has replaced Disability Living Allowance (DLA) for people aged 16 and over.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is a disability benefit paid to people who are 16 to 64 years old. It has replaced Disability Living Allowance (DLA) for people aged 16 and over. If you are over 16 you can no longer put in a new claim for DLA. All new claims will be for PIP.

Personal Idependence Payment

You can get PIP if you have a mental or physical condition which affects your day to day life. This might include the following:

  • Dealing with other people,
  • Shopping and paying bills,
  • Planning and following journeys,
  • Preparing food and eating, or
  • Washing and bathing.

PIP is made up of two parts, known as components. These are the:

  • Daily living component, and
  • Mobility component.

Each component is paid at either a standard or an enhanced rate. The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) use a points system to see if you can get the components at the standard or enhanced rate. They give you points if you have difficulties with certain activities.

Weekly amounts from April 2018

Daily living component

  • Standard rate - £57.30
  • Enhanced rate - £85.60

Mobility component

  • Standard rate - £22.65
  • Enhanced rate - £59.75

PIP is not affected by your income, capital or savings. You can get the full amount of PIP on top of other benefits or tax credits. However, PIP may affect Constant Attendance Allowance or war pensioner’s mobility supplement.

PIP is paid directly into your bank, building or post office account every 4 weeks.

 

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Within this subject

  1. Overview
  2. What is PIP?
  3. What if I claim Disability Living Allowance (DLA)?
  4. Who can get Personal Independence Payment (PIP)?
  5. How will I be assessed for Personal Independence Payment (PIP)?
  6. How do I claim?
  7. What questions are on the ‘How your disability affects you’ form?
  8. Should I get supporting evidence?
  9. Will I have to go to a face to face medical assessment?
  10. Can I appeal if I think a decision is wrong?
  11. Do I need to speak to a welfare advisor?
  12. What happens if my health changes when I’m getting Personal Independence Payment (PIP)?
  13. Can someone claim Personal Independence Payment (PIP) for me?
  14. Information on Personal Independence Payment (PIP)
  15. Next steps
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