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Last updated:
20/11/2017

Can I apply for Universal Credit?

How will income, savings and property affect my Universal Credit?

  1. Overview
  2. What is Universal Credit?
  3. How much can I get?
  4. What if I am working or studying?
  5. What if I care for someone or have children?
  6. What about my housing costs?
  7. How will income, savings and property affect my Universal Credit?
  8. Will the Benefit Cap affect me?
  9. How will I get my Universal Credit payments?
  10. What is the claimant commitment?
  11. Can I appeal if I disagree with a decision?
  12. When will I have to claim?
  13. Next steps

What if I have savings or capital?

Capital means how much your assets, shares or investments are worth – the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) will not count your home and business as assets.

Savings means money you have in your bank, building society or post office accounts, cash and ISAs.

How much your capital and savings are worth may affect the amount of Universal Credit (UC) you get:

  • If you have capital and savings below £6,000, your UC will not usually be affected.
  • If you have capital and savings above £16,000 you will not get any UC.
  • If you have capital and savings between £6,000 and £16,000, you can still get UC, but you will get £4.35 less for every £250 you have over £6,000 in savings and capital.

What if I get some money from working?

You will get less UC if you earn some money from:

  • Being employed, working for someone else,
  • Being self-employed, working for yourself, or
  • Statutory sick pay, maternity or paternity pay and adoption pay.

You may be able to earn some money without it affecting how much UC you get every month. This is called work allowance. You will be eligible for a work allowance if you (and/or your partner) either:

  • have responsibility for a child and/or
  • have limited capability for work

For every £1 you earn above the work allowance, you will get 63p less UC.

What your work allowance will be will depend on whether or not you get help with housing costs. If you get help with housing costs, the work allowance is £397 but if you do not get help with housing costs, it is £192.

What if I get other benefits?

Disability Living Allowance and Personal Independence Payment do not affect your UC, but the following benefits will be taken off your UC:

  • Contribution-based Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • Contribution-based Employment and Support Allowance
  • Carer’s Allowance
  • Bereavement and widow’s payments
  • Maternity Allowance
  • Industrial Injuries Benefit
  • Money from an ex-husband or wife.

Within this subject

  1. Overview
  2. What is Universal Credit?
  3. How much can I get?
  4. What if I am working or studying?
  5. What if I care for someone or have children?
  6. What about my housing costs?
  7. How will income, savings and property affect my Universal Credit?
  8. Will the Benefit Cap affect me?
  9. How will I get my Universal Credit payments?
  10. What is the claimant commitment?
  11. Can I appeal if I disagree with a decision?
  12. When will I have to claim?
  13. Next steps

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